KIDNEY / NEPHROLOGY NEWS

RESTRICTIVE APPROACH TO BLOOD CELL TRANSFUSIONS SAFE FOR HEART SURGERY PATIENTS

A restrictive approach to blood cell transfusions in patients undergoing cardiopulmonary bypass surgery led to fewer transfusions than a more liberal approach, without any increased risk of acute kidney injury. The results were consistent in patients with and without chronic kidney disease before surgery.

ASN FOUNDATION FOR KIDNEY RESEARCH ANNOUNCES 2019 GRANT RECIPIENTS

The ASN Foundation for Kidney Research announced the 2019 recipients of research grants to advance new understandings of—and treatments for—kidney diseases. The Foundation will fund 46 leading researchers working to cure kidney diseases. These include 27 new projects, with 19 continuing from 2018. Established in 2012 by the American Society of Nephrology, the Foundation funds research that will help improve the health of approximately 40 million Americans burdened by kidney diseases, the 9th leading cause of death in the United States.

ASN Foundation for Kidney Research Announces 2019 Grant Recipients

The ASN Foundation for Kidney Research announced the 2019 recipients of research grants to advance new understandings of--and treatments for--kidney diseases. The Foundation will fund 46 leading researchers working to cure kidney diseases. These include 27 new projects, with 19 continuing from 2018. Established in 2012 by the American Society of Nephrology, the Foundation funds research that will help improve the health of approximately 40 million Americans burdened by kidney diseases, the 9th leading cause of death in the United States.

DO MEDICAL-ALERT BRACELETS BENEFIT PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE? Study finds lower rates of kidney failure, but no reductions in safety events.

Highlights • In a study of patients with chronic kidney disease who did or did not wear medical-alert bracelets or necklaces, the frequency of safety events—or unintended harm from medical therapy—reported at annual visits was not different in the 2 groups. • Wearing a medical-alert accessory was linked with a 62% lower risk of developing kidney failure, after adjustments. • There was no significant difference in rates of hospitalization or death in those who did and did not wear medical-alert accessories.

STUDY EXAMINES VOLUME OVERLOAD IN PATIENTS INITIATING PERITONEAL DIALYSIS

Volume overload, or too much fluid in the body, is a frequent problem in patients with kidney failure initiating peritoneal dialysis. Volume overload tends to improve over time after starting peritoneal dialysis, but is consistently higher in males vs. females and in patients with diabetes vs. those without. Volume overload is associated with a higher risk of premature death.

Insulin under the influence of light

By understanding how the brain links the effects of insulin to light, researchers are deciphering how insulin sensitivity fluctuates according to circadian cycles. At the heart of their discovery are neurons of the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus, a part of the brain that masters this balance. These results should also encourage diabetic patients to consider the best time to take insulin to properly control its effect and limit the risk of hypoglycemia.

Vascularized Kidney Tissue Engineered by WFIRM Scientists

Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) researchers have shown the feasibility of bioengineering vascularized functional renal tissues for kidney regeneration, developing a partial augmentation strategy that may be a more feasible and practical approach than creating whole organs.

Genomic collision may explain why many kidney transplants fail

Up to one in seven kidney donors and recipients may have a type of genetic incompatibility that leads to organ rejection, researchers have found.

Hopkins-Led Team Finds Biomarkers to Diagnose Serious Kidney Allergic Reaction

Newswise imageA team led by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers says it has identified two protein biomarkers in urine that may one day be used to better diagnose acute interstitial nephritis (AIN), an underdiagnosed but treatable kidney disorder that impairs renal function in the short term and can lead to chronic kidney disease, permanent damage or renal failure if left unchecked.

New approach uses magnetic beads to treat preeclampsia

A new proof of concept study shows that functionalized magnetic beads reduced blood levels of a harmful molecule by 40%, which doubled the effect of a different molecule that aids blood vessel function, opening new perspectives for the treatment of preeclampsia.

TMVR Benefits Hold Firm in Post-Market Registry (CME/CE)

(MedPage Today) -- Do data point to a future 'transcatheter toolbox' for mitral disease?

Multivessel PCI Not Best in Cardiogenic Shock

(MedPage Today) -- Trial data show mortality disadvantage versus treating culprit lesions only

ASN 2017: The Future of Personalized Nephrology

(MedPage Today) -- Tissue engineering, drug discovery challenges among highlight topics

10 Questions to Challenge Your Medical News Savvy

(MedPage Today) -- Weekly News Quiz: October 20-26

Surgical Weight Loss; Low hs-cTNT Still Risky; VAD Before Pediatric Transplant

(MedPage Today) -- Cardiovascular Daily wraps up the top cardiology news of the week

EndoBreak: T1D and Vitamin D; VA's T2D Guideline; Oral Acromegaly Drug

(MedPage Today) -- News and commentary from the endocrinology world

For SAVR, Afternoon Tops Morning for Surgical Safety (CME/CE)

(MedPage Today) -- Circadian genes appear to interact with ischemia-reperfusion injury effects

Robotic-Assisted Surgery Adds Time, Costs Without Affecting Outcomes (CME/CE)

(MedPage Today) -- No improvements compared with laparoscopic procedures in kidney removal and rectal cancer

RAS Blockade After TAVI Tied to Better Outcomes (CME/CE)

(MedPage Today) -- Patients with severe aortic stenosis see reduced all-cause mortality

Borderline Pulmonary Hypertension Tied to Mortality Risk

(MedPage Today) -- Small increases in pressure might signal left heart failure, not early PAH

How long is acid detectable in the body?

Acid, or LSD, is a drug that can cause hallucinations and feelings of euphoria. In this article, learn how long these effects last and how long the drug stays in the human body.

Kidney function tests: Everything you need to know

There are many different types of kidney function tests, usually involving the blood or urine. In this article, learn about the tests and what to expect from the results.

What to know about low urine output

Low urine output can occur as a result of various causes, including infections, dehydration, and urinary tract blockages. The treatment options will depend on the cause. Learn more about low urine output here.

What to know about kidney cleanses

Kidney cleanse programs typically involve restricted diets or consuming only water and juice for several days. Supporters claim that these programs can cleanse the kidneys and promote better health. However, there is little scientific evidence to support these claims. Learn more here.

What foods are good for kidneys?

Foods that are beneficial for kidney health include dark leafy greens, berries, and apples. Foods to avoid include high-phosphorous foods. Learn more about foods that are good for the kidneys here.

What can cause lower back pain?

Lower back pain is very common and often the result of a minor injury or overuse. However, it can sometimes be a symptom of conditions that affect the spine, such as spinal stenosis, degenerative disc disease, scoliosis, sciatica, and cauda equina syndrome. Learn more about lower back pain here.

What to know about urinary urgency

Urinary urgency is the urgent need to urinate despite not having a full bladder. It may occur alongside frequent or painful urination. Learn about the possible causes and treatment options here.

What to know about blood in urine (hematuria) in females

Blood in the urine, or hematuria, may arise after an infection or injury. Some causes are specific to females or more likely to affect females than males. Learn more here.

What to know about the protein test and results

Total protein tests measure the amount of protein in a person's urine or blood. In this article, we discuss the total protein test, including its uses, normal protein levels, and what abnormal levels mean.

What causes back pain on the lower right side?

Lower back pain is a common complaint. When back pain occurs on the lower right side, causes can include sprains and strains, kidney stones, infections, and conditions that affect the intestines or reproductive organs. Learn more about what causes back pain on the lower right side and when to see a doctor here.

HYPERTENSION NEWS

Hypertension: Looking beyond the classic risk factors

In a recent study, scientists have investigated the impact of the environment where we live on the risk of developing hypertension and metabolic syndrome.

Hypertension treatment may slow down Alzheimer's progression

New research finds that nilvadipine, a drug doctors commonly use to treat high blood pressure, increases the blood flow to the brain's hippocampus.

Common acne drug could prevent artery hardening

Scientists have identified the mechanism that causes artery hardening and have shown that the antibiotic minocycline can prevent the process in rats.

Heart disease death: 'White coat hypertension' may double risk

New research examines the correlations between untreated 'white coat hypertension,' treated 'white coat effect,' heart disease, and heart disease death.

3 interventions could prevent millions of cardiovascular deaths

A new Harvard study argues that implementing three heart health interventions at a global level could save millions of lives in the next couple of decades.

What foods are good for kidneys?

Foods that are beneficial for kidney health include dark leafy greens, berries, and apples. Foods to avoid include high-phosphorous foods. Learn more about foods that are good for the kidneys here.

Regular sleep schedule likely benefits metabolic health

Studies have linked sleep insufficiency to metabolic conditions. Now, new research reveals that varying time and length of sleep could also be a factor.

Can blood pressure drugs help reduce dementia risk?

A large study analyzing the medical data of thousands of people suggests that dementia incidence is lower among those who take blood pressure medication.

How a fruit compound may lower blood pressure

New research in mice and human cells finds that a fruit compound lowers blood pressure. The study also reveals the mechanism by which it does this.

How much coffee is too much for the heart?

In a large new study, researchers identify 'the tipping point' for consumption after which coffee can increase a person's cardiovascular risk.

GENERAL MEDICAL NEWS

Fournier gangrene of the genitals linked to SGLT2 inhibitor drugs

WGNTV: The study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine examined ties between sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors, used in Type 2 diabetes treatment, and a genital infection called Fournier gangrene.

Immune cell test identifies patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.

Stanford: Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have created a blood test that can flag the disease, which currently lacks a standard, reliable diagnostic test.

Candida auris infections spreading rapidly across the globe.

NY Times: A deadly, drug-resistant fungus is infecting patients in hospitals and nursing homes around the world. The fungus seems to have emerged in several locations at once, not from a single source.

Rehydrating with soft drinks after exercise increases AKI injury markers

Chapman et al, AJP, March, 2019: "Stage 1 AKI (i.e., increased serum creatinine ≥0.30 mg/dl) was detected at postexercise in 75% of participants in the Soft Drink trial compared with 8% in Water trial (P = 0.02). Furthermore, urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), a biomarker of AKI, was higher during an overnight collection period after the Soft Drink trial compared with Water in both absolute concentration [6 (4) ng/dl vs. 5 (4) ng/dl, P < 0.04] and after correcting for urine flow rate [6 (7) (ng/dl)/(ml/min) vs. 4 (4) (ng/dl)/(ml/min), P = 0.03]." Possible mechanism implicated was fructose-mediated release of vasopressin. Of relevance to MesoAmerican nephropathy.

Universal flu vaccine on the near horizon

SBS.com: Scientists at the Doherty Institute and Monash University say they have discovered immune cells that could fight off all forms of the flu virus, which could see an end to annual flu jabs. Depending on a patient's immune system, a cover-all flu shot would only be needed every 10 years, or potentially just once in a lifetime - and could help prevent thousands of deaths worldwide every year.

Alzheimer disease linked to brain infection by gingivitis bacteria.

New Scientist: Multiple research teams have been investigating P. gingivalis, and have so far found that it invades and inflames brain regions affected by Alzheimer’s; that gum infections can worsen symptoms in mice genetically engineered to have Alzheimer’s; and that it can cause Alzheimer’s-like brain inflammation, neural damage, and amyloid plaques in healthy mice.

Bone mass increased by 800% in a mouse model

Medical News Today: A groundbreaking set of studies has found that blocking certain receptors in the brain leads to the growth of remarkably strong bones. Could a new osteoporosis treatment be on the horizon?

Harvard Intensive Review of Nephrology 2018 now available

Intensive Review of Nephrology................ Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital Board Review Prep for ABIM Nephrology exams, expand your knowledge and integrate the latest guidelines into your daily practice................. Video Online - $1,395.00.......... Online + USB* - $1,495.00 ...............Audio MP3s: CDs - $1,495.00 ............USB* - $1,495.00...............Combo: Online Video + Audio MP3 CDs + USB - $2,095.00.

Randomized PIVOT trial published in NEJM suggests more IV iron is better.

NEJM (Macdougall): Conclusions: Among patients undergoing hemodialysis, a high-dose intravenous iron regimen administered proactively was noninferior to a low-dose regimen administered reactively and resulted in lower doses of erythropoiesis-stimulating agent being administered.

Increased mortality with citrate-containing dialysate - HDF fluid in France.

LeMonde: (in French -- paste this link into Google translate) ...les patients traités par un liquide de dialyse (ou dialysat) au citrate présenteraient une surmortalité de 40 % par rapport à ceux traités avec d’autres produits plus anciens à l’acétate ou à l’acide chlorhydrique (HCl).........Tel est le principal constat d’une étude rétrospective pilotée par Lucile Mercadal (Inserm, CESP 1018 et hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière) réalisée avec une équipe de néphrologues et de biostatisticiens français (REIN-Agence de la biomédecine, ABM), à partir des données du registre national REIN. Elle a été présentée le ­3 octobre lors du congrès de la Société francophone de néphrologie, dialyse et transplantation ; elle n’est pas encore publiée.

One in five haematological cancer patients suffer blood clots or bleeding

(Aarhus University) In the years following haematological cancer, one in five survivors suffer a blood clot or bleeding which requires hospital treatment. A new comprehensive survey from Aarhus University could contribute to the prevention of these serious complications.

3D body mapping could identify, treat organs, cells damaged from medical conditions

(Purdue University) A Purdue University team has come up with 3D body mapping technology to help treat organs and cells damaged by cancer and other medical issues.

Researchers reach milestone in use of nanoparticles to kill cancer with heat

(Oregon State University) Researchers have developed an improved technique for using magnetic nanoclusters to kill hard-to-reach tumors.

Unexpected mechanism allows CaMKII to decode calcium signaling in the brain

(Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience) A new study from researchers at Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience (MPFI) has shed light on the unexpected mechanism that allows calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase, or CaMKII, to decode and translate calcium signaling in the brain. Using advanced imaging techniques and novel biosensors, Ryohei Yasuda, Ph.D. and his team have revealed new insights into CaMKII's activity at the single synapse level.

University at Buffalo scientist receives federal grant for "Jewels in Our Genes" follow up

(University at Buffalo) Study will provide evidence for whether other genes not yet discovered are related to familial breast cancer risk in African Americans.

ALS patients may benefit from more glucose

(University of Arizona) A new study led by scientists at the UA has uncovered a potential new way to treat patients with ALS, a debilitating neurodegenerative disease.

Tool dearches EHR data to find child leukemia patients for clinical studies

(Children's Hospital of Philadelphia) Researchers who analyzed data in the electronic health records of children seen by hematology/oncology specialists at three large medical centers have developed an algorithm to accurately identify appropriate pediatric oncology patients for future clinical studies. By expediting and refining the selection of patients for research, the researchers aim to ultimately improve outcomes for a variety of pediatric cancers

Educational art exhibit shows promise in improving public's knowledge about hot flashes

(Indiana University) Can art impact public perceptions of menopausal hot flashes and women affected by them? According to an Indiana University School of Nursing expert, yes.

Interdisciplinary approach decreases broad spectrum antibiotic usage

(Association for Professionals in Infection Control) An interdisciplinary approach to antimicrobial stewardship involving comprehensive blood culture identification (BCID) testing decreased broad spectrum antibiotic use, according to new research presented last week in Philadelphia at the 46th Annual Conference of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC).

New female external catheter technology reduces CAUTI by 50%

(Association for Professionals in Infection Control) Hospital-wide introduction of new female external catheter technology halved the number of catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) according to new research presented last week in Philadelphia at the 46th Annual Conference of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC).